Wednesday, 27 March 2013

Driving Curfew Could Come Into Force For Young Drivers

The British Government are looking at putting a driving curfew for young drivers to prevent road accidents and slash young driver insurance premiums.

Over the last few years the subject of putting young driver curfews in place has been suggested on more than one occasion. As a result it looks like MPs and specialists within the car insurance industry are now discussing it as a very real option.

Ministers are also suggesting:

1. An extended probation period after learner drivers pass their test. During this period 6 penalty points results in disqualification - Ministers are suggesting that this needs to be extended from two to three years.

2. A zero alcohol limit

3. A restriction on the number of passengers carried in the car

4. A minimum period of 6 - 12 months to learn to drive - learner drivers will no longer be able to take their driving test once they hit 17.


There is also a suggestion that learner drivers can take lessons on motorways and driving tests could change to include more unsupervised driving time. It's thought that this will allow test examiners to observe candidates in a more natural surrounding when assessing skills.

Commenting on behalf of the Association of British Insurers, Otto Thoresen stated:

"We have long campaigned for changes to the current approach to learning to drive which does little to help young people become safe, secure drivers."

Mr Thoresen added that newly qualified young drivers are "at a much higher risk of having a serious crash on our roads which is reflected in the cost of their car insurance, insurers want to see young drivers become safer drivers which in turn will result in more affordable premiums."

iKube currently offers a young drivers insurance scheme that rewards newly qualified drivers for being safe on the road. The scheme also rewards young drivers who agree not to drive late at night (between 11pm - 5am) in a bid to help reduce accidents and slash premiums.

Source: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-politics-21937188